Free Pet Adoption this Weekend During Maddie’s Days

If you’re thinking about adding a furry family member to your pack anytime soon, this weekend is the time to do it!

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Adoptable dogs pose for prospective parents at Maddie’s Days last year.

Adoption fees will be waived at participating rescue groups or shelters in Alameda County, Contra Costa County, San Francisco and Santa Clara County for two days, Saturday, May 31 and Sunday, June 1.

This is all thanks to Maddie’s Fund, an organization dedicated to improving the lives of companion animals. They give a rescue or shelter from $500 to $2000 per dog or cat adopted during Maddie’s Days, the nation’s largest free adoption event. Those funds allow for the care and rehabilitation of pets who might otherwise be euthanized.

Maddie’s Fund has set a goal of 10,000 adoptions during this year’s Maddie’s Days.

PrintIf you are interested in adopting a pet for free this weekend, 90 shelters and rescues in four Bay Area counties are participating in the event.

maddie's fund picA special event called “Rescue Row” will be held in San Francisco on Alabama Street, between 15th and 16th Streets. The event will feature food trucks, a beer garden, music and of course, adoptions! The San Francisco SPCA, Muttville Senior Dog Rescue, Northern California Family Dog Rescue and San Francisco Animal Care and Control, among others, will all be on hand with adoptable dogs and cats.

If you would like to learn more, visit the Maddie’s Days or Maddie’s Fund websites.

More Suspicious Meatballs Found in San Francisco

suspicious meatballs san franciscoYet another round of suspicious meatballs has been found in a San Francisco park frequented by dogs. A woman spotted a plate of meatballs with pills sticking out of them Monday morning at the Sunset Reservoir near the corner of Ortega and 24th Avenue.

Police are testing the meatballs to see if the pills are poisonous. A $25,000 reward is being offered by the Animal Defense Fund for information leading to the arrest of the person or persons responsible for these meatballs.

This is the fourth such sighting of suspicious meatballs in San Francisco in the past two years. A dachshund named Oskar died in July 2013 after eating a suspicious meatball in the Twin Peaks neighborhood.

Some residents think off-leash dogs might be targeted because not all owners clean up after them.

To keep your dog safe, keep him on a leash unless he is 100 percent reliable with recall and the command “off!” or “drop it!”

We have frequented the Sunset Reservoir and there are many areas an off-leash dog can get into trouble with poisonous meatballs potentially hiding in the brush on the hills flanking the fences of the reservoir. We stay on the path and only let the dogs run on the grass where we can see them.

How to Deal With Aggressive Dogs; The Pooch Coach Trains USPS Workers

We’ve been bringing you her expert tips here at Yellow Dog Blog and now our training expert is the official trainer of San Francisco USPS mail carriers on how to deal with aggressive dogs.

Beverly Ulbrich visited the main mail-sorting facility March 21 to lead two talks to a group of postal carriers before they headed out on their daily routes.

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Beverly talked about how fear is the driving force for why dogs attack.

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Suspicious Meatballs Found Again in San Francisco

San Francisco dog owners beware! Suspicious meatballs were once again spotted in the Twin Peaks and Richmond neighborhoods of San Francisco, setting off another scare nearly eight months after a dachshund died from eating a poison-laced meatball.

KRON 4 San Francisco

Police found hundreds of poisonous meatballs in July, 2013 around the Twin Peaks and Diamond Heights neighborhoods. Investigators think whoever left those poisoned meatballs was trying to kill dogs.

And that perpetrator may be striking again.

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Attention Bay Area: Save Fort Funston!

It’s time to spread the word: the Golden Gate National Recreational Area is trying to cut off-leash access by nearly 90 percent at local recreation areas. The GGNRA released a 1500-page proposal to eliminate off-leash dog areas in the Bay Area at Fort Funston, Crissy Field, Ocean Beach and elsewhere in Marin and San Mateo.

We, the dog public, need to fight back! Chair of SFDOG Sally Stephens is leading the charge against these changes. Join Sally and the SF Dog Connectors at Fort Funston Saturday, October 19 at noon to learn more about what you can do to help save the Fort!

For those of you unfamiliar with the story, the GGNRA released a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) in September for the proposed Dog Management Plan. They released a Draft EIS in 2011, which would have cut where you can go with your dog in the GGNRA by 90 percent. Public comment on the Draft EIS was overwhelmingly against the plan by a margin of 3-to-1. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed a resolution opposing the plan, in large part because it did not consider the impacts on city parks if the GGNRA made these cuts.

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Yellow Dog and Sundown enjoying some off-leash time at Fort Funston. If the GGNRA proposal is implemented, we may not get to do this anymore.

Despite this opposition, the GGNRA has essentially not changed their plan. The Preferred Alternative in the SEIS is the same as the Draft EIS with some minor changes. It still cuts where you can walk with your dog, both on-leash and off-leash, by roughly 90 percent.

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Dog Walkers Behaving Badly

Dog walkers are great. They help our pooches get a much needed break when we’re off at work. But what about those who walk ten, 12 or even 16 dogs at a time? Can they properly care for that many dogs at once?

San Francisco recently implemented some new standards for dog walkers; as of July 1, 2013, a dog walker must have a permit when walking 4 to 8 dogs, may not walk more than 8 dogs at a time, and must clean up after all dogs in their care.

But apparently, not every dog walker got the memo. Our KRON 4 News colleague Stanley Roberts went to Golden Gate Park to find dog walkers in violation of the new rules in his most recent People Behaving Badly segment.

Yellow For a Cause: Strut Your Mutt in San Francisco

Yellow Dog and Sundown were rescued from the mean streets and given a chance at a good life; now they’re giving back to other homeless dogs in shelters! The pups will be attending the Best Friends Animal Society 1st Annual Strut Your Mutt event in San Francisco. Join us Saturday, September 21 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Treasure Island for a day of fun-filled doggie festivities, including a 1.5-mile walk and costume contest hosted by Yellow’s mommy, KRON 4’s Chief Meteorologist Jacqueline Bennett. If you can’t make it, you can always make a donation! Any help is greatly appreciated to help save other homeless dogs! Hopefully we’ll see you there!

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SF Dog Connect Announces Dog Meetup; Get Free Training Tips

San Francisco dog owners have an opportunity to get free training tips from expert dog trainer Beverly Ulbrich at Glen Park Canyon. Just sign up to join the group and you’ll meet other dog owners as well as Beverly, who will be giving behavior tips free of charge. Residents from other parts of the Bay Area are also welcome! Yellow might even make an appearance; he might be out of town that weekend but we will keep you updated!

San Francisco Dogs at Risk of Poisoning

San Francisco Police have found nearly 100 poisoned meatballs since July 3 spread throughout six city neighborhoods. The meatballs have been found in Twin Peaks, Diamond Heights, Lower Heights, Cole Valley, Hayes Valley and Bernal Heights. One dog, a dachshund, has died already after eating a meatball on the corner of Crestline Drive and Burnett Avenue.

The meatballs are laced with rat poison. Police speculate the person responsible is either afraid of dogs or tired of barking and seeing poop.

Keep an eye out and make sure your dog is fully trained with the “off!” command to prevent him from eating one of these horrible meatballs. Expert dog trainer Beverly Ulbrich can show you the ropes if your dog doesn’t know this command well enough to prevent him from this danger.