The commercial pet food industry can be a scary business. From questionable ingredients that can make your dog sick to misleading marketing tactics, navigating the shelves to choose a healthy and affordable food is a daunting task.

We consulted canine nutrition expert Sabine Contreras, author of The Dog Food Project, to find out what’s really in commercial dog food—and we’ve gone raw!

Find out why we made the switch and tips for transitioning your dog to a healthier—and sometimes more affordable—diet.

Summer is around the corner and pet parents will soon be hitting the road— many with their dogs in tow. But does the mere sight of the car make your pup anxious? Are you worried getting on a plane may send your pet into panic? There are things you can to do help!

We’ve got the top tips to traveling—whether by car, plane, or even if you want your furry friend to take a “staycation.”

You lock eyes with your new furry friend at the shelter or an adoption event. You know it’s meant to be, so you scoop them up and take them home.

There’s so much to do! Paperwork, vet appointments, new dog gear—toys, beds, treats, and home decor are a must! And of course, you have to name your new family member.

Like two-legged kids, you don’t have a lot of time to get your know your new addition before giving them a moniker. For us, Yellow Dog and Sundown were fairly easy to name, but Mocha—now affectionately and more aptly named Squeak—was more difficult to pin down.

Maybe you’re like us and are indecisive about your new dog’s name because you just don’t know their personality yet. Or maybe you want something unique. After all, some of the most popular names might be getting old—who wants to be the third Cooper or Bella at the dog park?

Either way, Shutterfly’s dog name generator can help.

By: Jessica Brody, Guest Writer

Most dog owners love playing with their dogs in the snow—seeing how they react to playing with snowballs, encountering snowmen, and chasing neighborhood kids while they slide down hills on sleds. But as much fun as winter brings for our dogs, it can also bring some dangers. It’s important to be aware of the hazards winter poses to your dog’s health so you can take the necessary steps to protect him.

Who can resist that squishy pug face? Or those stubby little doxie legs? How about those piercing blue Huskie eyes?

When choosing a dog for your family, there is so much more to consider than looks. Choosing your dog based solely on looks could be disastrous—if you choose a dog ill-suited for your lifestyle, he may end up in a shelter and your family heartbroken. So before you impulsively pick your new furry family member, make sure you take into account these four major issues.

It’s one of the most gut-wrenching decisions you may ever make: surrendering your dog. There are a number of reasons you may have to give up your beloved pet:

  • Your new landlord doesn’t allow pets
  • Your dog has a litter of puppies you can’t keep
  • You can’t afford to provide the care your dog needs

So you list your dog or dogs in a classified ad for free, hoping to find him a new loving home. But sadly, some dogs are targeted in “free to a good home” ads and can end up in the wrong hands.

They’re the unsung heroes of war—military working dogs (MWDs) who serve alongside our troops, sniffing out explosives and standing watch to protect their handler and their units.
MWDs will often serve multiple tours of duty, usually with different handlers. But what happens when the dogs are retired from the military? Popular opinion is the dogs should stay with their handlers, but that doesn’t always happen.

*Note: this is NOT a paid endorsement. All opinions are our own.

Does your dog howl or hide when 4th of July fireworks go off? Does he cower when thunderstorms hit? Does he dread the car and even have accidents on car rides? Can he not stand when you leave his side and destroy things while you’re gone?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, the ThunderShirt might be for you.

Most pet parents are guilty of it at one point or another—babying your dog. Whether it’s extra cookies, carrying them around, dressing them up in cute outfits or just plain letting them get their way, we can treat our furry friends the way we would treat our toddlers. But could this be making a good dog go bad?

San Francisco based dog trainer Beverly Ulbrich is helping us outline the pros and cons of treating your dog like a child.